Sunday, June 20, 2010

Beautiful Things Happen When a Woman Trusts God by Sheila Walsh

Even as a lifelong Christian, Sheila Walsh struggled to trust God completely.  It took a complete emotional breakdown for her to address the fear and shame that had kept her from making a final step of faith so that she could live completely for God.  Even then, as her Biblical profiles exemplify, faith involves a moment-by-moment commitment to believing in God's provision.

I was astounded that a Christian with such a public life as a writer, speaker, and singer would lay bare what are probably the darkest moments of her life, in order to demonstrate her understanding of trust in God, forged in the trenches, so to speak.  In fact, I was encouraged by the idea that we can trust God to make our dreams come true, when those dreams are of God and for His purpose.  Welsch blends in her personal experiences, with detailed stories of people we think we know from the Bible:  Anna, Joseph, Martha, Abraham... letting us see through fresh eyes the faith dilemmas these people faced, and giving the opportunity to accept the all-encompassing love of a Savior.  My faith was deepened and challenged, and my heart touched by what God has done in the lives of his children.   

I recommend this book especially to women who feel lost in the shuffle of life, and wonder if God still has a plan for them.  He's never left your side. 

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255

Just a little more...

If I could save up a little more money, I could work from home...
Someday I'm going to buy that little VW bug convertible...
One day I'm going to take that Caribbean cruise...

Someday.  My bills will be paid; my house will be clean; my flab will be gone; my life will be organized.  Yet, each day another 24 hours comes and goes, and for every step forward toward one goal, another goal lies tantalizingly out of my grasp. 

And I wonder.  Does ANYONE really have it all together?  Or are we all juggling time maintaining our house with building a family or juggling energy keeping a job with building a career?

The apostle Paul said, "I have learned the secret of being content in any and every situation, whether well fed or hungry, whether living in plenty or in want" (Phillipians 4:12 NIV). 

There is a line, a tightrope even, that every healthy person must walk.  Everyone should set goals, aim for something greater, commit to personal growth.  We're not created to be stagnant.  On the other hand, in the present moment, we have to be grateful for NOW, for what we have today, for the relationships we are a part of.  We have to be content with what is and accept what has been before we can make realistic strides toward what may be.  

Will you be happy with just a little more?  Or can you be content with what you have right now?